Colombia Highlights

The exceptional cities and landmarks to visit in Colombia are spread throughout the country so it is possible to visit at least one of the following.

1. Museo de Oro (Bogotá) – Housing the most impressive collection of pre-Colombian gold shaped in thousands of decoration pieces, the Gold Museum has preserved all sorts of metal objects of the prehispanic era as a cultural heritage treasure. The museum also leads investigations to fill-in the social context of the archaeological findings. Entrance is free and museum hours are Monday and Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
2. La Ciudad Perdida (Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta) – Deemed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, the Lost City of the Tayrona people has not ceased to amaze archeologists and visitors since it was “discovered” in 1976 by a team from the Colombian Institute of Anthropology.
3. Cartagena de Indias – A cultural and tourist district since 1991, Cartagena peaks as one of the most romantic and historically rich cities on the Caribbean coast. During the colonial era, this port was one of the most important of America because of all the gold and precious metal shipments departing from here to Spain. Naturally, the port was attacked by pirates several times, for which the city had to be build into a fortress. Nowadays Cartagena has a well-developed urban zone and conserved old town.
4. Parque Nacional del Café (Quindío) – Founded by the National Federation of Coffee Growers in Colombia, this theme park exhibits folkloric Colombian architecture, offers plenty of foods based on coffee and includes attractions like a cable car and a roller coaster. The Park of Coffee Culture Fund runs this non-profit operation with the mission of preserving cultural heritage and promoting ecotourism in the region.
5. San Agustín – A World Heritage Site since 1995, San Agustín housed several of the most important South American cultures, thus making this a significant archeological center of the continent. Hundreds of stone statues claim the territory where once a pre-Colombian civilization marked their tombs. On the outskirts of San Agustín one can find the Archeological Park, where most of the monumental statues can be found.
6. Tayrona National Park (Santa Marta) – One of the most important parks of Colombia, this 15,000 hectare space – out of which 3,000 hectare is marine territory – contains over 350 species of algae and over 770 species of land plants. There are also archeological ruins left by the Tayrona civilization, which occupied the area from pre-Colombian times until well into the colonization.
7. Santa Fé de Antioquia – With eight churches and plenty of colonial houses from the 16th, 17th and 18th century, Santa Fé de Antioquia is an architectural jewel, and has been recognized as such by Colombians and foreign visitors who increasingly improve the economy with weekend business as they visit the Bridge of Occident, the Metropolitan Cathedral, the Plaza Mayor, among others.
8. Plaza de Bolívar (Bogotá) – Walking through the most historically charged plaza of the country gives pedestrians the sense of becoming part of history itself. Plaza de Bolívar is surrounded by the Palace of Justice, Capitolio Nacional, the Lievano building, which currently houses Bogotá’s major City Hall, and the Primary Cathedral of Bogotá. In the center of the plaza you will find the first public statue erected in the city, representing Simón Bolívar.